Mom shames mom-shamers right back in viral rant: come down from 'judgmental mountain.'

Mom shames mom-shamers right back in viral rant: come down from 'judgmental mountain.'
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Karen Johnson, a stay-at-home-mom of three kids, wrote a post about mommy-shaming on Facebook that is going properly viral, with almost 325,000 shares. In her post, Johnson writes about how unhelpful it is for people to be so judgmental of moms, whether they be strangers, family, and even friends. The constant judging and shaming goes on all the time, by people in real life as well as online, and Johnson is not here for it.

Girlfriends, I got to get something off my chest. My house is never clean. Like ever. I have friends (with kids) whose...

Posted by The 21st Century SAHM on Wednesday, July 19, 2017

The gist of the post is that you don't have to have a clean house, or never drink, or feed your kids all organic food in order to be a good mom. Religion and sexual orientation don't determine who is and isn't a good mom. The mom who doesn't let her kids watch TV or play video games isn't necessarily a better mom than the one that does.

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Johnson's suggestion is that everyone should come down off "judgmental mountain" and support each other. Motherhood is difficult enough without the weight of other people's expectations. Johnson writes that moms should be telling each other, "Hey, motherhood is hard. You're doing a good job. Raising kids can knock the wind out of a person. You got this."

Speaking to Scary Mommy, Johnson explained that she was just tired of all the disapproval being dished out to moms everywhere. She said,

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We are all just doing our best. I’ve been blasted online by people who don’t know me for drinking, being a helicopter parent, not watching my kids enough, having a messy house, etc. And my friends who formula feed are put through the ringer. It’s ridiculous. We all want to feel like we are doing a good job, so why not give each other support and grace instead of unfair and unnecessary judgment?

Johnson's post may not successfully put an end to mommy-shaming, but hopefully it reminds people that they are doing it, and that they probably shouldn't be. Not to judge them or anything.

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