Breastfeeding mom fired for pumping at work loses discrimination suit because "men can lactate too."

Breastfeeding mom fired for pumping at work loses discrimination suit because "men can lactate too."
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Well, this is some bullshit.

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Every woman has the right to deal with the horrible frustration of pumping at work.
(stock photo of some lady who was probably fired)

Angela Ames is a former loss-mitigation specialist at Nationwide Insurance. Shortly after returning from maternity leave, Ames was fired after requesting break time and a private space in the office to pump during the day. She sued for discrimination and lost.

Now, the Supreme Court has rejected her petition to overturn the trial court's ruling, which included the finding "that breastfeeding-related firings aren't sexist because men can lactate, too," says RawStory.

Yep, that old defense.

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"I hate when it's Daddy's turn to nurse me." (stock photo)

And if you learn the full story, it gets worse!

Here's what happened: After giving birth prematurely (what did I tell you?), Ames had two months off for maternity leave (hang on, that's not the part that's supposed to make you angry). On the day she got back, she couldn't access the lactation room at her office because no one would give her the key—she was told it would take several days for her to get in. Fun first day back at the office!

Her supervisor, who is clearly an unfeeling boob (Sorry, I only use puns when I am filled with rage), told her to "just go home and be with your babies." He then drafted a resignation letter for her.

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That wasn't enough for the court that first heard Angela's case to rule against Nationwide. According to the ACLU's Galen Sherwin:

The courts dismissed Angela's case saying that she didn't take sufficient steps to complain internally before writing her letter of resignation – even though her own supervisor was the one who handed her the pen and dictated what to write – and therefore, she wasn't really fired. The courts found it irrelevant that Angela was supposed to take these additional steps while engorged and waiting for a pumping room that her employer told her wouldn't be available for several days.

The court also deemed "just go home and be with your babies" to be a gender-neutral comment, even though it's exactly that kind of thinking that led Congress to pass the Pregnancy Discrimination Act. Now that the Supreme Court has decided not to hear the case, Ames has no more options. Her employers are off the hook.

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Only a baby could be fooled into thinking that's fair.

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"I see what you did there, lady." (stock photo)

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