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In a body camera video going viral this week, police pulled over a car in Orlando only to discover the driver—Aramis Ayala—was a state attorney. Returning her driver's license, the officer quickly asked Florida's first black state attorney what agency she worked for.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHOE9LmEt9o

"Thank you, your tag didn't come back, never seen that before," replied the officer. "We're good now."

"What was the tag run for?" asked Ayala.

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"Oh, we run tags all the time," responded the officer. "Whether it's a traffic light and that sort of stuff, that's how we figure out if cars are stolen and that sort of thing. Also, the windows are really dark. I don't have a tint measure, but that's another reason for the stop."

Ayala proceeded to ask the officers' for their information. It had the vague feeling of a student in the principal's office.

As the video went viral, many interpreted the traffic stop as racial profiling.

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Others were just obsessed with Ayala's hand gesture:

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For her part, Ayala told Buzzfeed News that the stop was legal, but that that's not the end of it. "Since its release, the video has had more than 2 million views," she said. "To be clear, I violated no laws. The license plate, while confidential, was and remains properly registered. The tint was in no way a violation of Florida law."

She continued: "Although the traffic stop appears to be consistent with Florida law, my goal is to have a constructive and mutually respectful relationship between law enforcement and the community."

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"I look forward to sitting down to have an open dialogue with the Chief of Orlando Police Department regarding how this incident impacts that goal."

The Orlando Police Department in turn told BuzzFeed that the stop was "routine."

"In regards to the video, which was released by the Orlando Police Department last month, the officers stated the tag did not come back as registered to any vehicle. As you can see in the video, the window tint was dark, and officers would not have been able to tell who, or how many people, were in the vehicle."